A Language Learning Phenomenon — 5 Reasons 1,000,000 People Use This App To Learn Languages

n 2007, the language experts at Babbel set out to make language learning easy, effective, and accessible to everyone. Fast-forward ten years and the four founders have multiplied into over four-hundred language enthusiasts — among them linguists, teachers, polyglots and content creators — who produce courses for fourteen different foreign languages from seven different native languages. That’s ninety-eight combinations of individually tailored courses. So how’s it working out?

The numbers speak for themselves: over 1,000,000 people choose to learn a language with Babbel, and that number continues to grow.

But why have the Babbel apps proved so popular? Here are our top five reasons:

Znalezione obrazy dla zapytania language

1. The People

From a rabble of language enthusiasts working in a loft in the Kreuzberg neighborhood of Berlin, Babbel HQ has since evolved to house a broad range of experts united by the common goal of creating the best language learning tools possible. That may all sound rather, um… lofty, but as Alphabet’s Eric Schmidt said, such overt ambition possesses a strong force of attraction.

For a company that requires specialists in ninety-eight language combinations, this force of attraction is integral to finding the right people, whether it’s a Spanish linguist who can design a course in Polish, or a graphic designer who can help localize the look and feel across seven display languages.

This imperative of multilingual, intercultural expertise has endowed the company with a truly unique topography of skills, and an unrivaled potential for innovation within the world of language learning.

2. The Product AND The Service

App-based learning carries a few inherent advantages. It’s convenient: you have your smartphone by your side at all times, fully-charged and ready to guide you through the labyrinth of contemporary life, from the gentle tap of the snooze in the morning to the emoji-peppered goodnight-message you compose for a loved one in the evening.

Using your smartphone to learn a language makes it easy to fit your lessons into your daily routine. They also only last 15-20 mins each!

Furthermore, an online product can be constantly improved and updated, blurring the distinction between product and service. A Babbel learner’s progress is measured, and the difficult parts of courses are optimized to ensure information is conveyed as effectively as possible. Yes, all that German grammar may sometimes seem complicated, and yes, some of those French words don’t look anything like they sound, but that’s exactly where Babbel comes in handy: it prides itself on making the complicated simple.

3. The Learners

All of the 1,000,000+ learners have their own story — their own reason for learning a new language. As Babbel is in frequent contact with them, some truly inspiring tales have emerged. Gianni, for example, is probably our oldest learner at the age of 102. He’s an Italian technophile who has long used Skype to communicate with his daughter in New York, and who likes to practice his English with his great-granddaughter’s nanny. Cecilia is also Italian, but has lived abroad for many years, and speaks multiple languages. She’s now using Babbel to learn German with a view to moving to Berlin in the next few years.

Babbel’s employees (we call ourselves Babbelonians) are also keen Babbelers. We’ve taken part in numerous challenges like the one above to see how much we can learn within a given period of time, whether that be Turkish in seven days, or French in a working week…

Qing dynasty vase found in attic sells for $19 million

A rare Imperial Qianlong porcelain vase (18th century) is displayed at Sotheby's auction company in Paris, on May 22, 2018.

rare Qing dynasty vase that was discovered in the attic of a French family home has sold at auction in Paris for €16.2 million, or about $19 million.
That’s the absolute record for a piece sold at Sotheby’s Paris, and the record for a Chinese porcelain sale in France.
The intricately decorated vase was hidden away in an old shoebox. After finding it, the owners took it to Sotheby’s Paris to be appraised, whereupon the auction house told them it dated from the 18th-century. They set an auction estimate of €500,000 to €700,000 (about $590,000 to $825,000), which was blown away by the sale.
According to Sotheby’s, the vase was left to the grandparents of its present owners by an uncle, in a will which also included several other works of Chinese porcelain, and some Japanese artworks, including an “unusual bronze mirror” which will also be sold at auction at the same time as the vase.
Sotheby’s expert Olivier Valmier said in a statement that on opening the shoebox he was “immediately struck” by the quality of the item, which he said was a Yangcai Famille-Rose porcelain vase bearing a mark from the reign of the Qianlong Emperor, who ruled China from 1736 to 1795.
“The vase is of exceptional rarity: the only known example of its kind,” Sotheby’s said. “Famille Rose porcelains of the period (or yangcai porcelains, as they are known) are extremely rare on the market, with most examples currently housed in the National Palace Museum in Taipei and other museums around the world.”
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Qing dynasty vase found in attic sells for $19 million

Updated 12th June 2018
A rare Imperial Qianlong porcelain vase (18th century) is displayed at Sotheby's auction company in Paris, on May 22, 2018.

Credit: THOMAS SAMSON/AFP/AFP/Getty Images

Qing dynasty vase found in attic sells for $19 million
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Written byJames Griffiths, CNNJacopo Prisco, CNN
A rare Qing dynasty vase that was discovered in the attic of a French family home has sold at auction in Paris for €16.2 million, or about $19 million.
That’s the absolute record for a piece sold at Sotheby’s Paris, and the record for a Chinese porcelain sale in France.
The intricately decorated vase was hidden away in an old shoebox. After finding it, the owners took it to Sotheby’s Paris to be appraised, whereupon the auction house told them it dated from the 18th-century. They set an auction estimate of €500,000 to €700,000 (about $590,000 to $825,000), which was blown away by the sale.
According to Sotheby’s, the vase was left to the grandparents of its present owners by an uncle, in a will which also included several other works of Chinese porcelain, and some Japanese artworks, including an “unusual bronze mirror” which will also be sold at auction at the same time as the vase.
The vase was stored in a shoebox in an attic for decades.

The vase was stored in a shoebox in an attic for decades. Credit: THOMAS SAMSON/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
Sotheby’s expert Olivier Valmier said in a statement that on opening the shoebox he was “immediately struck” by the quality of the item, which he said was a Yangcai Famille-Rose porcelain vase bearing a mark from the reign of the Qianlong Emperor, who ruled China from 1736 to 1795.
“The vase is of exceptional rarity: the only known example of its kind,” Sotheby’s said. “Famille Rose porcelains of the period (or yangcai porcelains, as they are known) are extremely rare on the market, with most examples currently housed in the National Palace Museum in Taipei and other museums around the world.”
In April, a Famille-Rose porcelain bowl sold in Hong Kong for over $30 million, the auction house said.
Despite its rarity and potential value, the current owners weren’t originally very keen. “We didn’t like the vase too much, and my grandparents didn’t like it either,” one of them told Agence France-Presse.
Henry Howard-Sneyd, Sotheby’s chairman of Asian Art for Europe and the Americas, was optimistic about future such discoveries.
“Chinese art has been admired and collected across Europe for centuries, but the importance of certain pieces is occasionally lost over time,” he said in a statement.
“Given the huge appetite for Chinese art among today’s collectors, now is the moment to scour your homes and attics, and to come to us with anything you might find!”